Nancy Magee

Nancy Magee

Ready, set, go! San Mateo County students have begun returning to school for the 2022-23 school year. After a summer dominated more by personal rest and recovery than prepping for COVID-19 response, students, families and staff are returning to school energized and excited to dive into a healing and positive year with their students.

Educators have accomplished the near impossible, and certainly the unimaginable, these past two years. They morphed from classroom-based instruction to distance learning practically overnight and with little warning. They procured and deployed laptops, organized and distributed school meals, provided COVID-19 testing and tests, held vaccination clinics, and kept their communities abreast of ever-evolving health protocols, all while trying to maintain some sense of normalcy for their students.

Recommended for you

(7) comments

Terence Y

Well written, willallen and Mr. van Ulden. I’d add that public educators in California have accomplished the near impossible – getting paid handsomely for allowing kids to fall a year or two behind. Parents have noticed as they’re pulling their kids out of public schools. We can only hope public educators can do better, although from state rankings, hope will likely be misplaced.

Dirk van Ulden

Just imagine what the last generation would have accomplished without the school systems subsuming the responsibilities of parents and real educators. They only made it to the moon..

willallen

This column proves we need to be pro-choice when it comes to where we spend our education dollar.

Dirk van Ulden

However - not a word about actual education. How about improving test test scores in serious subjects as in STEM? Seems to me that a number of the program components are the responsibility of the parents. The school system needs to focus on what we pay them for. Education without woke policies and programs.

Tafhdyd

Dirk,

We agree on one thing. The parents are responsible for a number of the components of the child's education. Unfortunately the students that do poorly often have the parents that think education is the job of the school. They drop them off in the morning and pick them up in the afternoon and expect them to be all trained and ready to go. Even a smart kid in an expensive private school will not do as well as possible if the parents don't participate. Some of the private schools will boot them out if the parents do not participate.

Dirk van Ulden

Taffy - my wife worked as a secretary at one of the RWC elementary schools. She is bilingual and told me horror stories of how some kids came to school. She and the janitor actually became foster parents during the school hours. Some kids refused to go home but had no choice. I can see that there are parents who do not care, others and others who just rely on the school system to educate their child without getting involved themselves. That is also how it was when I grew up in the Netherlands. Parents were never involved. I believe the school districts have developed the impression, perhaps inadvertently, that they will do all for the kids and (some) parents have gotten used to it, including not giving their children anything nourishing to eat. It is a sad situation but it will be tough to reverse. The children are our future, in that I agree with the Superintendent. I just wished she would emphasize formal, useful education as more important than equity and other social engineering aspects.

Tafhdyd

Dirk,

I am well aware of the same stories. My wife taught 1st grade for 34 years in the 70s, 80s and 90s.

Welcome to the discussion.

Keep it Clean. Please avoid obscene, vulgar, lewd, racist or sexually-oriented language.
PLEASE TURN OFF YOUR CAPS LOCK.
Don't Threaten. Threats of harming another person will not be tolerated.
Be Truthful. Don't knowingly lie about anyone or anything.
Be Nice. No racism, sexism or any sort of -ism that is degrading to another person.
Be Proactive. Use the 'Report' link on each comment to let us know of abusive posts.
Share with Us. We'd love to hear eyewitness accounts, the history behind an article.

Thank you for visiting the Daily Journal.

Please purchase an Enhanced Subscription to continue reading. To continue, please log in, or sign up for a new account.

We offer one free story view per month. If you register for an account, you will get two additional story views. After those three total views, we ask that you support us with a subscription.

A subscription to our digital content is so much more than just access to our valuable content. It means you’re helping to support a local community institution that has, from its very start, supported the betterment of our society. Thank you very much!