SAN FRANCISCO — The California Supreme Court ruled that two felony convictions stemming from a single act cannot be counted as separate strikes under the state’s three strikes sentencing law.

The 1994 law requires the doubling of a sentence if a defendant has a prior qualifying felony conviction, and that the person be given a life term if there are two such convictions.

The unanimous ruling on Thursday came in the case of Darlene Vargas, who was sentenced to 25-years to life for burglary on the basis of two prior convictions.

The high court said those convictions for robbery and carjacking stemmed from the same act — taking a car by force — and should not count as two separate strikes and prompt a tougher sentence.

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