Friday
February
27
2015
2:44 pm
Weather

  Home
  Local News
  State / National / World
  Sports
  Opinion / Letters
  Business
  Arts / Entertainment
  Lifestyle
  Obituaries
  Calendar
  Submit Event
  Comics / Games
  Classifieds
  DJ Designers
  Archives
  Advertise With Us
  About Us
 
 
 
 
Assembly approves statewide ban on single-use plastic bags
August 29, 2014, 05:00 AM By Fenit Nirappil The Associated

SACRAMENTO — California lawmakers passed a key hurdle Thursday in imposing the nation’s first statewide ban on single-use plastic bags.

The state Assembly approved SB270 on a 44-29 vote after rejecting the bill earlier in the week. It now heads to the Senate, where it must be approved by Sunday and has support from top Democrats who rejected a similar effort last year.

The new version won support from grocers by allowing them to charge 10 cents for paper and reusable bags, and from some manufacturers by including $2 million in loans to help shift production to reusable bags.

The bill by Sen. Alex Padilla, D-Los Angeles, would prohibit single-use plastic bags at grocery stores and large pharmacies in 2015 and at convenience stores in 2016. It has sparked one of the most contentious debates in the last weeks of the legislative session, with aggressive lobbying by environmentalists and bag manufacturers.

For years, a statewide plastic bag ban has been an elusive goal for lawmakers trying to reduce the buildup of plastic waste in oceans and waterways that costs millions of dollars to cleanup. About 100 local jurisdictions in California already have adopted similar bans, including Los Angeles and San Francisco.

“We live in a throw-away society,” said Assemblyman Bill Quirk, D-Hayward. “What this bill does is to make an effort to do one little thing: Get people to use reusable bags.”

Opposition to the bill has focused on the 10-cent fee, which legislators of both parties have called unfair to consumers.

“We’re adding significantly to their costs,” said Assemblyman Curt Hagman, R-Chino Hills. “This is a tax on our consumers.”

The American Forest & Paper Association, representing paper bag makers, says SB270 unfairly treats their commonly recycled products like plastic, while holding reusable plastic bags to a lower standard for recyclable content.

The American Progressive Bag Alliance, a coalition of plastic bag manufacturers, released a statement calling on the Senate to reject a bill that “threatens 2,000 California manufacturing jobs, hurts consumers and puts billions of dollars into the pockets of grocers — without providing any benefit to the environment.”

An influential grocer’s union, which had withdrawn its support earlier, now backs the bill.

 

 

Tags: plastic, reusable, paper, manufacturers, consumers, california,


Other stories from today:

Teen’s death leads to safeguards for some air guns
U.N.: Ebola disease caseload could reach 20,000
Mystery of Death Valley’s moving rocks solved
 

 
Print this Page Print this Page  |  Bookmark and Share
<< Back
 
Return To Archives
 
  


 
 
 
Daily Journal Quick Poll
 
What do you think of the new net neutrality rules imposed by the FCC on broadband providers?

Agree, Internet access should be governed like a utility
Don't agree, it will limit the free market
Worry about taxes
Worry it will prevent further access
It's too complicated

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
San Mateo County resident with measles may have exposed Berkeley restaurant diners
Patrons of La Mediterranee restaurant in Berkeley may have been exposed to measles last Friday eveni..
Leonard Nimoy, famous as Mr. Spock, dies at 83
LOS ANGELES — Leonard Nimoy, the actor known and loved by generations of "Star Trek" fans as the p..
House clears way for short-term Homeland Security bill
WASHINGTON — Congress closed in Friday on approving a short-term funding bill for the Homeland Sec..
8 shot to death, including gunman, in Missouri rampage
TYRONE, Mo. — A gunman killed seven people and wounded an eighth person in an overnight house-to-h..
More >>  
 
 
  
 
  
 
©2015 San Mateo Daily Journal
San Mateo County open houses