Monday
August
03
2015
12:11 pm
Weather

  Home
  Local News
  State / National / World
  Sports
  Opinion / Letters
  Business
  Arts / Entertainment
  Lifestyle
  Obituaries
  Calendar
  Submit Event
  Comics / Games
  Classifieds
  DJ Designers
  Archives
  Advertise With Us
  About Us
 
 
 
 
California drought helps coho salmon migration
June 25, 2014, 05:00 AM The Associated Press

SAN RAFAEL — California’s massive drought has spelled bad news for many of the state’s fish. But in a strange twist, it appears to have been a boon to coho salmon migrating from a Northern California creek.

Nearly 20,000 juvenile coho swam out of the Lagunitas Creek in Marin County into the ocean this spring, the largest salmon migration since scientists started tracking fish outflow from the creek in 2006.

The migration bump is due to the lack of rain this year, scientists say. Juvenile coho, also known as silver salmon, normally gather in the lower reaches of the Lagunitas before heading to sea.

But the abundance of coho there means some get bumped out.

This year, the fish were trapped in small tributaries because of the drought. Since they didn’t make it to the lower Lagunitas, they weren’t driven away.

“This was an unexpected silver lining to the dry conditions this year, and it is related to the unique habitat limitations in this watershed,” said Eric Ettlinger, the aquatic ecologist for the Marin Municipal Water District, which helps with the annual salmon count.

But it’s not all good news for the fish. Biologists say that only 206 salmon egg clusters, known as “redds,” were counted in the Lagunitas this year, well below the 20-year average of 250 “redds.” And the fish that headed off to the ocean may not fare as well. They are smaller than normal and could face more difficult ocean conditions due to the warming pattern known as El Nino, scientists say.

“It’s kind of a fluke of nature that allowed those fish to survive in the first place, and now these fish are leaving during an El Nino event,” said Todd Steiner, executive director of the Salmon Protection and Watershed Network, which assists with the annual salmon count. “El Nino usually means less deep-ocean upwellings and therefore less food in the ocean, so we may still end up with less fish returning.”

———

Information from: San Francisco Chronicle, http://www.sfgate.com

 

 

Tags: salmon, ocean, lagunitas, known, creek, scientists,


Other stories from today:

 

 
Print this Page Print this Page  |  Bookmark and Share
<< Back
 
Return To Archives
 
  


 
 
 
Daily Journal Quick Poll
 
How often do you go to the movies?

Once a week
More than once a week
Once a month
A few times a year
About once a year
Never

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Obama heralds impact of power plant greenhouse gas limits
WASHINGTON — Calling it a moral obligation, President Barack Obama unveiled the final version of h..
Weather helps crews battling massive California wildfire
LOWER LAKE, Calif. — Cooler, wetter weather helped crews make inroads Monday against a massive Nor..
US auto sales strong in July on SUV, luxury demand
DETROIT — Summer deals and big demand for SUVs and luxury vehicles kept U.S. auto sales strong in ..
Former trader given 14 years prison for market manipulation
LONDON — A British judge sentenced a former Citibank and UBS trader to 14 years in prison Monday a..
Sen. Schumer, comedian Amy Schumer call for more gun control
NEW YORK — Stand-up comedian and actress Amy Schumer is teaming up with New York Sen. Charles Schu..
More >>  
 
 
  
 
  
 
©2015 San Mateo Daily Journal
San Mateo County employment ads