Thursday
April
17
2014
8:56 am
Weather
  Home
  Local News
  State / National / World
  Sports
  Opinion / Letters
  Business
  Arts / Entertainment
  Lifestyle
  Obituaries
  Calendar
  Submit Event
  Comics / Games
  Classifieds
  DJ Designers
  Archives
  Advertise With Us
  About Us
 
 
 
 

Check out our archive of Dining Guides - Yum!

California air pollution drops over past decade
January 25, 2014, 05:00 AM The Associated Press

SACRAMENTO — While overall air quality in California has improved significantly over the past decade, about a third of the population lives where pollution is in excess of federal health standards, according to state officials.

The California Air Resources Board presented an assessment of smog and soot levels on Thursday in Sacramento, the Los Angeles Times reported.

The board’s report said smog fell 15 to 20 percent in urban areas since 2003, yet levels remain above federal health standards in parts of greater Los Angeles, the San Joaquin Valley, Sacramento and San Diego.

In the South Coast region, which includes Los Angeles and Orange counties, the number of high-ozone days has dropped 21 percent since 2003. State officials now estimate about 60 percent of people, including all coastal residents, live where smog meets federal health standards. But 6 million people in inland areas still live with unacceptably smoggy air, officials said.

Of the state’s five biggest urban areas, only the San Francisco Bay area meets all federal standards for ozone — the worst component of smog — and fine particulate matter, or soot, according to the assessment.

Air board officials took no action after hearing the staff report.

The evaluation came as exceptionally dry and stagnant weather this winter has worsened air pollution across California and the Southwest, with some of highest levels in the Central Valley, the Times said.

Officials said continuing spells of bad air could set the state back.

“I don’t think we should be too congratulatory because this year has been a bad year,” said board member John Balmes, a professor of medicine at UC San Francisco.

Health studies link ozone and fine-particle pollution to respiratory illness and other health problems, including asthma, heart disease and cancer.

Curbing smog over the next decade will require big cuts in nitrogen oxides and volatile organic compounds, according to the board’s report. Those gases — emitted by vehicles, factories and power plants — react in the air to form ozone and fine particles.

 

 

Tags: health, officials, federal, standards, ozone, pollution,


Other stories you might enjoy:

Hagel vows to get to bottom of nuke missile ills
California air pollution drops over past decade
Ukraine clashes resume, fires light up night sky
 

 
Print this Page Print this Page  |  Bookmark and Share
<< Back
 
Return To Archives
 
  


 
 
 
Daily Journal Quick Poll
 
How confident are you about the state of the U.S. economy?

Extremely confident
Confident
Somewhat confident
Not confident at all

 

 
Tabbed Structure - Regular
 
 
 
 
 
Three protesters killed in attack on Ukrainian base
MARIUPOL, Ukraine — The turmoil in Ukraine dominated the European landscape Thursday, as three pro..
Diplomats eye joint statement on Ukraine
GENEVA — High-level talks aimed at calming soaring tensions over the crisis in Ukraine went into o..
Jones, Godard, Cronenberg in competition at Cannes
PARIS — David Cronenberg deconstructs Hollywood, Tommy Lee Jones goes Western and reclusive New Wa..
More >>  
 
 
  
 
  
 
©2014 San Mateo Daily Journal
San Mateo County employment ads