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Jamieson: The voice of Panther baseball
April 26, 2014, 05:00 AM By Terry Bernal Daily Journal

Terry Bernal/Daily Journal
The voice of Burlingame baseball since the 2000 season, Tyler Jamieson provides an integral mystique the classic confines of Washington Park.

In terms of San Mateo County baseball, Tyler Jamieson should be as synonymous with the sport as hot dogs, apple pie, Chevrolet and Bob Uecker.

Jamieson has served as Burlingame’s public-address announcer since the turn of the century. At the classic confines of Washington Park — the only enclosed stadium-style venue in the county — Jamieson’s public-address voice is a perfect fit. And it has long been the highlight of the best baseball P.A. show in the county.

“He does a really good job keeping the outside world informed in our little world,” Burlingame manager Shawn Scott said.

Case in point, at the outset of Burlingame’s Wednesday matchup with Carlmont, the San Francisco Giants were playing an extra-inning game in Colorado. With the score tied going into the 11th inning, Jamieson, casually keeping tabs on the game on his trusty iPad, reacted instantaneously when the update of Hector Sanchez’s game-winning grand slam was posted.

With the finish of the Giants game some minutes later, Jamieson coolly chimed in between innings with an in-house announcement of the final score. And as the many Giants fans on hand at Washington Park celebrated with a round of applause, Jamieson was already cueing up a round of Rihanna’s “Don’t Stop the Music,” then moments later fired up the Burlingame offense by fading into a rally snippet of Led Zeppelin’s “Rock and Roll.”

With such a natural flow for integrating the big leagues into his day-to-day, it should come as no surprise that Jamieson also works for the Giants. As an AT&T Park usher since 2006, he mans the Marina Gate in center field. And yes, he has marched in both of the Giants’ World Series parades.

It is fitting Jamieson patrols the center-field concourse for the Giants, as he got his start on the Burlingame mic during the 2000 baseball season by essentially saying: Put me in coach, I’m ready to play. Then a student at Burlingame, he approached frosh-soph manager Jesse Velez about keeping score for the team.   

“I think he just came up to me and said: ‘Coach, I’d like to keep score,’” Velez said.

And that’s what jumpstarted the career of the local great, who branched out to man the mic for both the frosh-soph and varsity home games that season. He has since become a definitive presence in the Burlingame athletics ranks. He also provides the public-address voice for Panthers football and splits time with longtime Burlingame basketball P.A. man John Horgan. Jamieson also works as the statistician for all three teams. And his latest venture is as the P.A. voice of Burlingame’s lacrosse team.

But with a flare and feel for the game of baseball, Jamieson has established himself as a unique public-address voice in the realm of Washington Park. In a field saturated with people merely imitating the public-address announcers to whom they grew up admiring, Jamieson doesn’t sound like anybody else, according to Velez.      

“If I heard him anywhere I would recognize his voice,” Velez said.

Velez left Burlingame after the 2004 season to take the varsity managerial job at Aragon, but Jamieson was just getting started with his life’s work for Panthers athletics and has been manning the press table in the top row behind home plate ever since.

“When [players] come there, kids know they’re going to get their names announced,” Scott said. “It’s kind of an excitement thing for these kids. We also do it at the [frosh-soph] level, so I know the [frosh-soph] kids get excited about it with the music between innings, the music before games. So, he brings a pretty good element.”

For years, Jamieson relied primarily on a portable CD player to entertain players and fans alike with an assortment of rock tunes. In recent years though, Jamieson’s press table has turned into something of a high-tech bonanza.

He still keeps the CD player on standby, since it has a built-in AM/FM radio, to play KNBR’s Giants broadcasts prior to Panthers games. But the device is a dinosaur compared to the plethora of gizmos strewn about. Of the many functions on his iPad, the most important is the ESPN iScore app, which he piggybacks through a Verizon Jetpack hotspot to send real-time rotisserie scoring to the Burlingame Athletics website. He also uses an old Hewlett-Packard laptop for music via iTunes and uses an Optimus amp along with an Alto ZMX52 four-track mixer to pump up the volume.

Oh, and then there’s the most important tool in his arsenal — his Burlingame baseball cap, which he doesn’t always wear but always has at the ready.

Jamieson said he couldn’t have imagined the seemingly sci-fi press table when he first got started in 1999. 

“In my wildest imagination, no, but then again, technology is advancing too fast for me,” Jamieson said.

It is for all of us. But you wouldn’t know it to step into Tyler Jamieson’s world at the baseball-rich confines of Washington Park.

 

 

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