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OP-ED: Fast-food subsidies
November 06, 2013, 05:00 AM St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Is fast food so vital to the nation that taxpayers should spend $7 billion a year to supplement the industry’s profits? Imagine the outcry if that was proposed.

And yet a study by economists at the University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana and the University of California at Berkeley’s Labor Center says it’s already happening.

Seven billion dollars a year is what it costs taxpayers for Medicaid, food stamps and the other public assistance programs for fast-food workers who are paid poverty-level wages.

A second report, “Super-Sizing Public Costs” by the National Employment Law Project, said low wages and missing benefits at the 10 largest fast-food companies in the country cost taxpayers about $3.8 billion a year.

Another way to look at it: McDonald’s posted $1.5 billion in third-quarter profits. Taxpayers paid $1.2 billion last year for public assistance to the McDonald’s workforce. That’s $300 million per quarter, a 20 percent contribution to the company’s bottom line.

It’s enough to give you indigestion.

The “Fast Food” researchers calculated that the cost to Missouri taxpayers, where about 49 percent of fast-food workers receive public assistance, is about $146 million a year.

Post-Dispatch reporter Kavita Kumar wrote Tuesday that Allan MacNeill, a Webster University political economist, said the public cost was probably underestimated. That’s because it did not include managers and people who work fewer than 10 hours a week.

The study also looked at only five of the largest federal public assistance programs, excluding other federal and state programs that would have pushed the figures higher, MacNeill said.

By under-paying employees, companies push their real cost of doing business onto the public at large. This can be called corporate welfare. Or socialism. But not capitalism.

Fast-food workers should be paid a living wage. The corporations that hire them must stop relying on the public for anything more than buying the occasional burger.

 

 

Tags: public, billion, taxpayers, assistance, workers, about,


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