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Pet tips
September 01, 2014, 05:00 AM By Scott Delucchi

There is something I miss about the days of getting film processed. When I was a kid, our family would drop off our roll of film at the yellow Fotomat drive-through booth in Millbrae, get a small slip of paper stamped with a due back date, then head back a week or so later. On that return trip, we could hardly wait to flip through the pack (24 or 36 photos) to see how many winners we had. Even some of the lousy photos could be fun. In a way, for this “kid,” it was like opening a pack of baseball cards and anxiously thumbing through for singles (the cards I needed to complete a team or set) and, of course, for Giants players. These days, we take photos of everything and it costs us nothing. We delete tons of shots, keep even more, rarely print any and have immediate gratification with a good shot. Within seconds, we share that photo with our social media friends and get immediate feedback, shares and tags. All that is great, but I still miss the buildup and element of surprise (not the cost!) of “old school” photo processing. Last week, some of your friends likely posted shots of their dogs online, for National Dog Appreciation Day. Great shots, too. To take even better shots of your pets, consider these tips: Get down to your pet’s level, don’t stand above them. I’ve even seen pet photography pros lie on the ground to get their shot. Get close. Too often, pets get lost in the photo unless you make an effort to get close. Also, tighter shots lead to fewer distracting background elements in the frame. Take photos while someone else in your family is playing with your pet to capture your pet engaged, active and unsuspecting. And, use natural light. A flash distracts pets and can lead to those awful red eye shots.

Scott oversees PHS/SPCA’s Adoption, Behavior and Training, Education, Outreach, Field Services, Cruelty Investigation, Volunteer and Media/PR program areas and staff from the new Tom and Annette Lantos Center for Compassion.

 

 

Tags: shots, photos, through, photo,


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