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Pet tips
May 12, 2014, 05:00 AM By Scott Delucchi

An old friend called with good news. He added a 10-month-old border collie/cattle dog mix to his growing family. His dog is set to arrive soon; she’s house trained, close to full-grown at 10 months and recently had her first heat cycle. He knows spaying her is the right move, but was wondering about timing. Should he time the appointment close to the day she’s scheduled to arrive or wait and let her get comfortable in her new home? Dogs have two heat cycles per year, generally every six to eight months apart, so his new dog is likely not due to have another cycle for at least a few months. Medically speaking, the surgery can wait a bit and it actually might be a good idea. The dog has lived with one person for months. She’s going to experience her first plane ride (which could heighten her stress and compromise her immune system), then she’ll move into a new home with new people. That’s a lot all at once for a young dog. Giving her two to three weeks to settle in before having her spayed seems like a good approach. But, we wouldn’t advise waiting much longer than that. For the surgery itself, local residents have at least three options: private veterinarian, shelter clinic or, depending on where you live, a free mobile clinic. The last option, one offered by Peninsula Humane Society, is designed for low- or fixed-income residents. We bring our mobile clinic into targeted neighborhoods where we see high numbers of strays or owner-relinquished pets. We ask local resident to let their moral compass guide them. If they truly don’t need this free service, we offer a low-cost surgery at our on-site clinic, 12 Airport Blvd. in San Mateo. Our vets are spay/neuter specialists, performing up to 25 surgeries per day and our cost is about a third of that at a private veterinary clinic. 

Scott oversees PHS/SPCA’s Adoption, Behavior and Training, Education, Outreach, Field Services, Cruelty Investigation, Volunteer and Media/PR program areas and staff from the new Tom and Annette Lantos Center for Compassion.

 

 

Tags: clinic, months, surgery,


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