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Pet tips
April 28, 2014, 05:00 AM By Scott Delucchi

Visitors to our Center for Compassion who see a dog, cat, or bunny they aren’t quite ready to adopt, ask about putting the animal on hold. Sounds reasonable; it’s what you do when you see a pair of shoes or blouse you really like. We explain that we typically don’t place animals on hold. Our experience tells us that this leads to far fewer adoptions. We used to put animals on hold; on any given day, we’d have several on hold, in fact. Two things would often happen: the people who asked us to place an animal on hold wouldn’t return and other folks visiting and ready to adopt would get frustrated by the number of animals with “Sorry, I’m on hold” signs on their kennels. So, we did away with holds. Other visitors to our adoption center ask why we simply don’t allow them to enter the dog dorms and kitty condos on their own at will, even if they aren’t adopting. Again, sounds reasonable. But, we’re not a petting zoo. Our goal is to find good homes for the animals in our care as quickly as possible and we want the animals available to meet with serious adopters. We happily arrange mini play dates in our center’s Get Acquainted Rooms or dog park for people and families who’ve expressed an interest in adopting. They complete our simple one-page Adoption Profile and we set them up with the dog, cat or iguana who caught their eye. We spend time with them sharing what we know about the animal, answering questions and using their Adoption Profile as a conversation starter, but also give them time alone to see if they have a love connection. It’s not a hard sell, at all, but also not a free-for-all. We’ve found a good balance and do what we say we’ll do: make it easy for animals to go into good homes.

Scott oversees PHS/SPCA’s Adoption, Behavior and Training, Education, Outreach, Field Services, Cruelty Investigation, Volunteer and Media/PR program areas and staff from the new Tom and Annette Lantos Center for Compassion.

 

 

Tags: animals, adoption, their, center, animal,


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