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Pet tips
September 23, 2013, 05:00 AM By Scott Delucchi

Are pollinators important? Without them, life as we know it would end, so yes! Hummingbirds, moths, beetles, bees, bats and butterflies are the most common of these flying critters responsible for 75 percent of the flowering plants and crops around the globe. They’ve been receiving attention due to dwindling numbers and threats. Because expanding roads, lawns and buildings are replacing natural areas, pollinators don’t have as many places to rest, feed and pollinate. Have that little “birds and bees” talk with your kids. As the parent of a boy and girl, trust me, this one is more comfortable than the other! Tell them why bees are cool. Explain the threats I’ve named above and others like pesticides which are intended to target a pest, but also impact non-targeted species and plants. Another one of our pollinators, bats, will be the stars during a special event 6:30 p.m.-7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 2 at our Burlingame center. We couldn’t resist the Halloween timing! Did you know bats can eat 500-1,000 insects per hour? Or, that these much-maligned, spookified creatures can fly 60 mph and 10,000 feet up while migrating. Our guest speaker will cover rabies questions as well, separating truths from myths. For more information, please call 650/340-7022, ext. 369. While people are on the fence about sharing their yards with urban wildlife, we should be hospitable toward pollinators, and can take simple, inexpensive steps to attract them. Provide pollen and nectar sources by planting flowers that bloom different times of the year. Plant flowers in clumps and choose a variety of shapes and colors. Avoid pesticides and provide a source for water such as a bird feeder, solar powered for circulating water. And, select native plants for your yard, such as yarrow, California buckeye, aster, lupine, marigold, monkey-flower, Black-eyed Susan or buttercup. Crafty DIY types can build a bat house, butterfly house or bee box.  No permits needed, even in Burlingame. 

 

Scott oversees PHS/SPCA’s Adoption, Behavior and Training, Education, Outreach, Field Services, Cruelty Investigation, Volunteer and Media/PR program areas and staff from the new Tom and Annette Lantos Center for Compassion.

 

 

 

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