Wednesday
April
16
2014
11:48 pm
Weather
  Home
  Local News
  State / National / World
  Sports
  Opinion / Letters
  Business
  Arts / Entertainment
  Lifestyle
  Obituaries
  Calendar
  Submit Event
  Comics / Games
  Classifieds
  DJ Designers
  Archives
  Advertise With Us
  About Us
 
 
 
 

Check out our archive of Dining Guides - Yum!

White House defends Biden against Gates criticism
January 08, 2014, 05:00 AM The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — The White House is bristling over former Defense Secretary Robert Gates' new memoir accusing President Barack Obama of showing too little enthusiasm for the U.S. war mission in Afghanistan and sharply criticizing Vice President Joe Biden's foreign policy instincts.

In a book set for release next week by the publishing house Knopf, Gates writes that Biden is "a man of integrity," but also a political figure who has been "wrong on nearly every major foreign policy and national security issue over the past four decades."

Gates, a Republican, also slammed the National Security Council under Obama's watch. The Republican cited what he called the "controlling nature" of the White House, writing that Obama's national security team "took micromanagement and operational meddling to a new level."

Such tell-all books are not new to Washington and they're woven into the city's cultural fabric. In the inside-the-Beltway political culture, they burst into view, make a splash on TV, online and in the press and quickly fade. But in the case of the Gates book, the White House chose to speak out quickly and sharply.

The National Security Council issued a statement late Tuesday asserting that Obama relies on Biden's "good counsel" every day and considers him "one of the leading statesmen of his time." Not only that, the White House allowed news organization representatives to photograph Obama and Biden sitting together Wednesday at their weekly private luncheon. It was another sign that the president was not putting any distance between himself and Biden.

Former senior White House adviser David Axelrod said he was surprised when he heard about Gates' book. "He (Gates) always indicated he had a good working relationship with the president," Axelrod said on NBC's "Today" show.

Key passages of Gates' book, "Duty: Memoirs of a Secretary of War," were published in The Washington Post, New York Times and The Wall Street Journal.

In his memoir, Gates asserted that Obama showed a growing frustration with U.S. policy in Afghanistan.

"I never doubted Obama's support for the troops, only his support for their mission," Gates writes.

Obama approved the strategy of putting 30,000 additional troops into Afghanistan and placing Gen. David Petraeus in charge, even though some top advisers opposed the so-called surge he announced in December 2009.

Recalling a meeting in the situation room in March 2011, Gates writes: "As I sat there, I thought: The president doesn't trust his commander, can't stand (Afghan President Hamid) Karzai, doesn't believe in his own strategy and doesn't consider the war to be his. For him, it's all about getting out."

According to published reports about the book, Gates reveals he often found himself tempted to quit because of adversarial treatment he received from members of Congress. Gates served 4½ years as defense secretary, the last years of the George W. Bush administration and the first years of Obama's.

According to the published accounts of the book:

—Gates said that in private, members of Congress could be reasonable. "But when they went into an open hearing, and the little red light went on atop a television camera, it had the effect of a full moon on a werewolf."

—Gates recalls Obama and his secretary of state at the time, Hillary Rodham Clinton, discussing their opposition to Bush's 2007 surge of troops in Iraq. "Hillary told the president that her opposition to the surge in Iraq had been political because she was facing him in the Iowa primary. ... The president conceded vaguely that opposition to the Iraq surge had been political. To hear the two of them making these admissions, and in front of me, was as surprising as it was dismaying."

—Gates at times criticizes the Bush administration as well as its successor. He holds the Bush administration, in which he also served as defense secretary, responsible for what he considered misguided policy that squandered the early victories in Afghanistan and Iraq, according to the Times.

—In praise of Obama, Gates calls the president's decision to order Navy SEALs to raid a house in Pakistan believed to be the hiding place of Osama bin Laden "one of the most courageous decisions I had ever witnessed in the White House."

 

 

Tags: gates, obama, president, house, white, secretary,


Other stories you might enjoy:

White House defends Biden against Gates criticism
Benefits debate is first volley of election year
Maddux, Glavine, Thomas elected to Hall of Fame
 

 
Print this Page Print this Page  |  Bookmark and Share
<< Back
 
  


 
 
 
Daily Journal Quick Poll
 
How confident are you about the state of the U.S. economy?

Extremely confident
Confident
Somewhat confident
Not confident at all

 

 
Tabbed Structure - Regular
 
 
 
 
 
Governor calls special session on rainy day fund
SACRAMENTO — Saying the state’s budget surplus should be used to pay down debt, Gov. Jerry Brown..
Ex-California city leader gets 12 years in prison
LOS ANGELES — The former city manager of Bell, Calif., has been ordered to make restitution of $8...
Combat vehicles in east Ukraine fly Russian flag
SLOVYANSK, Ukraine — A column of armored vehicles flying Russian flags drove into a Ukrainian city..
283 missing, 4 dead in South Korea ferry disaster
MOKPO, South Korea — A ferry carrying 462 people, mostly high school students on an overnight trip..
E.L. Doctorow to receive Library of Congress Prize
NEW YORK — Novelist E.L. Doctorow will be honored with the Library of Congress Prize for American ..
More >>  
 
 
  
 
  
 
©2014 San Mateo Daily Journal
San Mateo County notice of bulk sale