Wednesday
October
01
2014
2:45 pm
Weather

  Home
  Local News
  State / National / World
  Sports
  Opinion / Letters
  Business
  Arts / Entertainment
  Lifestyle
  Obituaries
  Calendar
  Submit Event
  Comics / Games
  Classifieds
  DJ Designers
  Archives
  Advertise With Us
  About Us
 
 
 
 

Check out our archive of Dining Guides - Yum!

Superman’s past, future takes Comic-Con spotlight
July 22, 2013, 05:00 AM The Associated Press

SAN DIEGO — The cape, the curl, the S on the chest.

Superman is among comics’ most recognizable characters, and 75 years after Cleveland teenagers Jerry Siegel and Joe Schuster’s Kryptonian made his debut in the pages of Action Comics No. 1, his popularity remains stratospheric.

At Comic-Con International, Superman’s presence could be seen everywhere — from attendees wearing various incarnations of his many costumes to scenes from the television serials, cartoons, films, and even in comic books.

“Superman was the first comic book superhero and the first cross-media sensation. Practically everyone of every generation knows and recognizes the character, so that’s a huge asset for his ongoing popularity,” said Rob Salkowitz, author of “Comic-Con and the Business of Pop Culture.”

“Batman has been more successful in the past couple of decades because he is in some ways more relatable —but also because of the times. Batman speaks to our fears. He’s about revenge and darkness,” he said. “Superman speaks to our hopes. He’s about transcending our limitations. He’s about using vast power for public good, not private gain.”

Jim Lee, co-publisher at DC Entertainment who, along with writer Scott Snyder, created the new Superman comic book “Superman Unchained,” said few characters have been as relevant as Superman for so long.

“Name another character that’s been around for 75 years that’s still being published and relevant,” challenged Lee.

“There are very few that are still relevant to today’s culture and to today’s audience that are still being published,” Lee said, giving as examples that Superman was a social crusader in the 1930s, fought Nazis in the 1940s, was a yuppie in the 1980s “and in the ‘90s had a mullet!”

His popularity can be measured in not just sales of comics, but in tickets, too. Zack Snyder’s “Man of Steel” has made more than $630 million at the box office. And Saturday’s announcement of a sequel, of sorts, became the buzz of Comic-Con with news that it would pair Superman with DC’s other big name hero, Batman.

“Let’s face it, it’s beyond mythological to have Superman and our new Batman facing off, since they are the greatest super heroes in the world,” Snyder said.

At a Comic-Con panel exploring Superman’s history, and his future, a team of creators who have written the character, and actors on the shows and films about him, spoke about Superman’s relevance and invulnerability to obsolescence.

“Like Batman, this is a very malleable character that can change and still be his core influence,” said writer Grant Morrison, whose take on the character in the pages of “All-Star Superman” was critically lauded.

Morrison said that as times change, so too, has Superman, serving as a mirror not to a Phantom Zone, but to contemporary real life.

That was a nod to the darker tone in “Man of Steel,” a grittier take on not just Superman, but his upbringing and influences, too.

“He’s just reflecting a general tendency, as he always does. Superman has to reflect what people are feeling. I think it’s an inevitable part of his development,” Morrison said. “If he’s dark now, it’s because we’re all a little bit dark.”

With 75 years now passed, DC Entertainment co-publisher Dan DiDio said that the comics will continue their retelling of his early days, which in the New 52 universe that launched in 2011, includes a budding romantic relationship with Wonder Woman, a return trip to Krypton and more.

“Superman is such an identifier for who we are and what we are about — not just DC Comics but just comics in general,” DiDio said. “He is just as strong and probably more vibrant than ever.”

———

Follow Moore at http://www.twitter.com/mattmooreap

———

Warner Bros. Entertainment and DC Entertainment are owned by Time Warner Inc.

 

 

Tags: superman, comic, about, character, batman, comics,


Other stories from today:

 

 
Print this Page Print this Page  |  Bookmark and Share
<< Back
 
Return To Archives
 
  


 
 
 
Daily Journal Quick Poll
 
What do you think of the new statewide plastic bag ban?

It's great, we need to get rid of them
Doesn't matter around here, they are already banned
Don't like it
Hope it starts a nationwide trend
Don't like it, but whatever

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
Vehicle into power pole causes San Mateo power outage
San Mateo police are reporting a power outage after a low-speed vehicle collision on a constructi..
U.S. stocks drop sharply; Airlines sink
NEW YORK — The stock market sank Wednesday, with the Dow Jones industrial average falling 250 poin..
Secret Service chief resigns after security lapses
WASHINGTON — Secret Service Director Julia Pierson resigned Wednesday, a day after bitingly critic..
Truck deals help boost U.S. auto sales in September
DETROIT — Big discounts on pickup trucks helped keep U.S. auto sales strong in September. The p..
Hong Kong protesters threaten to occupy buildings
HONG KONG — Student leaders of Hong Kong's pro-democracy protests warned that if the territory's t..
More >>  
 
 
  
 
  
 
©2014 San Mateo Daily Journal
Menlo Park news